Getting Started with the Question of the Day Routine

The Quesiton of the Day routine… You may have heard of it, but you might be confused about what it is. How does it work? Is it just for fun or does it help kids learn? Do you have to think of new questions EVERY SINGLE DAY? Keep reading to answer these questions and learn some hacks to make the Question of the Day routine work in your classroom.

Text says: Getting Started with Question of the Day. Includes a photo of several fall-themed questions spread out on a table and of a question displayed in a pocket chart.

What is Question of the Day?

Question of the Day is a classroom routine where the teacher poses a question and students share their response. The question is usually displayed in the room for students to read. Students can sign their names or place pocket chart cards with their names under their response. Some teachers discuss these responses during morning meeting or use them to create a graph during math time.

Question displayed in pocket chart. Question says: Did you ride the bus today? Yes/No

Why Use Question of the Day?

You may be surprised at how much learning can happen from this quick little routine. These questions can support language arts, math, science, social studies and social/emotional learning in the following ways:

Language Arts:

  • reading for an authentic purpose
  • learning sight words
  • using picture cues
  • reading names of classmates
  • writing first names (or last names, or initials)
  • learning new vocabulary words

Math:

  • counting responses
  • creating graphs
  • comparing total responses (using words like more/less)
  • recording totals with numerals

Science/Social Studies:

  • using new vocabulary in meaningful ways
  • making connections between content areas
  • make predictions for experiments
Several questions spread out on a table. Questions include: Do you like to eat leaves? Have you harvested fruit? Do you have a vegetable garden? Predict: Will a plant grow from a vegetable top

Social/Emotional Learning:

  • learning more about classmates
  • recognizing similarities and differences among classmates
  • making connections to one another

Learn more details about the academic benefits in this post. You’re going to find that it’s a routine that’s just too beneficial to ignore!

How do you start?

First, think of some simple questions. You might want to start with a question that can be easily adapted, such as “Do you like _____?” You can then change the final word each day, using colors, sports or foods. This simple question stem can lead and endless supply of questions.

After a while, you can make your questions slightly more complicated by providing two choices: “Do you like _____ or _____?” Write these basic questions on sentence strips, with the last word on a short card. All you have to swap out each day is the card for the final word. Easy peasy!

Student response cards can be as simple as small index cards, student photos or punched out die-cut shapes with student names them.

You can squeeze this routine into various parts of the day:

  • attendance
  • morning meeting
  • math

What else should I know?

Want to learn more about how to include this simple routine in your day. Read this post to find out more about how to use question of the day.

Text says: 3 Ways to Use Question of the Day to Support Learning. Includes a photo with several school-related questions.

Then move on to this post to see ways to display and organize your daily questions.

Text says: Ways to Organize Question of the Day. Photos show two different sizes of boxes to store the questions in.

If you are worried about the time (or mental energy) involved in creating the questions, visit my store for ideas. There are questions for the entire school year, as well as questions to match science themes (like plants, insects or the farm) and fun themes, too (like fairy tales.)

Use these tips and tricks to set up a Question of the Day routine in your classroom. Your kids will have so much fun with it that they won’t even realize that they are learning!

Pin this post to refer to later!

Text says: Getting Started with the Question of the Day. Photo several plant-themed questions spread out on a table.
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